09.22.10

Contemporary Realistic Fiction by Bridget

Posted in Uncategorized at 12:38 pm by Bridget

I love vampires, paranormal, magical realism, Greek myths, dystopia, etc. as much as the next guy, but I’m a little concerned that this flood right now is going to create a wicked backlash. In a few years the realistic “problem novel” will be resuscitated and I will be forced to read all books about sad girls who cry.

I like having a mix of novels available–a little paranormal here, something fun and realistic there, and even an occasional book about sad girls who cry. (Note: I’m using the word “realistic” loosely to describe novels without paranormal or fantasy elements as I remember long discussions in college that lasted whole semesters on “What’s Real?’ and am not going to get into that now. Possibly a later blog post).

There are a few contemporary realistic fiction standouts right now like Will Grayson, Will Grayson that Janet mentioned earlier.¬†Another novel that’s on the realistic end of the spectrum and is super fun and most likely won’t make you cry is fabulous Portland author Suzanne Young’s The Naughty List. There are spying gadgets (which i love, more spies please!) and romance and sneaking. What more could you ask for, really?

Any other realistic fiction options out there that people recommend?

Bridget

2 Comments »

  1. Janet said,

    September 23, 2010 at 8:14 pm

    Bridget, you are an astute woman. I spent most of the afternoon reading book reviews. Almost all of the reviews for junior high age were fantasy or dystopia. There were a few realistic books for older teens, but not much. You are quite right in your observations. I love books about sad (but not too sad) girls who cry. I kind of prefer it when the girls make me laugh, like the ones in the Naughty List. I might be overlooking something, but besides Will Grayson and the Naughty List, the last realistic teen book I read was Peace Love and Baby Ducks by Lauren Myracle. And that was last spring. Uh oh. I will keep an eye out for some books about sad girls who cry and get back to you.

  2. Ann P said,

    September 25, 2010 at 9:52 am

    Revelation about Janet’s early reading preferences:
    At about age 8 Janet announced that she liked
    a. an old book (including books set in the past)
    b. a thick book
    c. a book that makes you cry
    Sounds like she hasn’t strayed too far from her original ideas.

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